Learning a language

Meet 3 Ontarians who discovered it’s never too late to learn the language of your ancestors – CBC.ca

Summary

On a cloudy, chilly day at Riverdale Farm, several families take part in an effort to revitalize Ianguages that have long been in danger of disappearing. 

Lindsay Hachey is arranging clipboards on a table with words written in Ojibway and Mohawk for the teachers to hand out. They’ll help both the parents and children learn how to describe the objects and animals they’ll see on the tour, which is the first language walk of its kind for the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto.

Hachey, the manager of the EarlyON Indigenous Language and Family Program, says activiti…….

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On a cloudy, chilly day at Riverdale Farm, several families take part in an effort to revitalize Ianguages that have long been in danger of disappearing. 

Lindsay Hachey is arranging clipboards on a table with words written in Ojibway and Mohawk for the teachers to hand out. They’ll help both the parents and children learn how to describe the objects and animals they’ll see on the tour, which is the first language walk of its kind for the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto.

Hachey, the manager of the EarlyON Indigenous Language and Family Program, says activities like it can help families learn the languages of their ancestors together.  

“What we found is that there was such a gap between generations not knowing their language,” she said during a phone interview with CBC Toronto. Hachey says that’s why it’s important to have parents learn along with the kids. 

“It’s something that they can do at home. It’s something they can do when they’re participating in the classes,” she said. “But it is definitely something that needs to happen in order to guarantee the success of learning the languages and teaching it to the little ones.”

She says for Indigenous families to reclaim their culture, it’s important to start with learning their languages. 

“The language was always based on knowledge of the land,” she said. “I always like to say there are special codes in the language that activate one’s DNA in reclaiming and remembering who they are.”

WATCH| This program is helping parents and children learn Mohawk and Ojibway together:

This language learning program is helping parents and children learn Mohawk and Ojibway together

For a group of language learners with the EarlyON Indigenous Language and Family Program, a walk through Riverdale Farm provides hands-on education. During the program’s first language walk at the farm, parents and their children got a chance to practice Mohawk and Ojibway alongside each other while out in nature. This is the seventh installment of a CBC Toronto series called Rediscovering Culture, which takes a look at how people in the GTA are reconnecting with, rediscovering and reclaiming their cultural roots. 2:57

Dr. How Hoong Au: Learning Mandarin at 75

Dr. How Hoong Au was born in Malaysia to parents from mainland China. His family figured it would be better for him to learn in English than Mandarin or Cantonese. 

That left Au without much knowledge of any Chinese language. He knew enough colloquial Cantonese to converse, but he didn’t know how to read or write it.

At the age of 75, Au now attends the Toronto Mandarin School alongside his grandchildren, who know the language quite well. He’s learning to speak, read, and write. 

“This is an opportunity to be able to connect with …….

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontarians-language-learning-gateway-culture-reconnection-1.6249188